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Things that matter to me

cyborgeoisie:

i love pride $ea$on i love the commodification of queer identity i love parades and festivals sponsored by banks who fund private prisons and alcohol companies who profit off the absurdly high rates of alcoholism in lgbt communities, i love the extra cops around to monitor the parade and make sure everything goes smoothly, i loooooove it

(via westcoastdreams)

What does a sustainable food system and life look like? Apparently a banana graveyard!

What does a sustainable food system and life look like? Apparently a banana graveyard!

Me at community day at Keele

Me at community day at Keele

madeofpatterns:

knittedlampshade:

unlearning problematic behavior is a long ass process

you will fuck up

handle it gracefully.

It’s also… you’re not resetting to some sort of innate default. There isn’t a real core you that knows better and is above mistreating people; it’s — you’re learning a new skill. It’s not about purity. It’s about learning.

(Source: yunglapras, via otipemsiw-deactivated20140616)

reallifescomedyrelief:

viforcontrol:

beautifuloutlier:

gwydtheunusual:

too—weird-to-live:

zafojones:

Circus Tree: Six individual sycamore trees were shaped, bent, and braided to form this.

how the hell do you bend and braid a tree

Actually pretty easy. Trees don’t reject tissue from other trees in the same family. You bend the tree to another tree when it is a sapling, scrape off the bark on both trees where they touch, add some damp sphagnum moss around them to keep everything slightly moist and bind them together. Then wait a few years- The trees will have grown together. You can use a similar technique to graft a lemon branch or a lime branch or even both- onto an orange tree and have one tree that has all three fruits.Frankentrees.

As a biologist I can clearly state that plants are fucking weird and you should probably be slightly afraid of them.

On that note! At the university (UBC) located in town, the Agriculture students were told by their teacher that a tree flipped upside down would die. So they took an excavator and flipped the tree upside down. And it’s still growing. But the branches are now the roots, and the roots are now these super gnarly looking branches. Be afraid.

But Vi, how can you mention that and NOT post a picture? D:

[source]

reallifescomedyrelief:

viforcontrol:

beautifuloutlier:

gwydtheunusual:

too—weird-to-live:

zafojones:

Circus Tree: Six individual sycamore trees were shaped, bent, and braided to form this.

how the hell do you bend and braid a tree

Actually pretty easy. Trees don’t reject tissue from other trees in the same family. You bend the tree to another tree when it is a sapling, scrape off the bark on both trees where they touch, add some damp sphagnum moss around them to keep everything slightly moist and bind them together. 
Then wait a few years- The trees will have grown together. 

You can use a similar technique to graft a lemon branch or a lime branch or even both- onto an orange tree and have one tree that has all three fruits.

Frankentrees.

As a biologist I can clearly state that plants are fucking weird and you should probably be slightly afraid of them.

On that note! At the university (UBC) located in town, the Agriculture students were told by their teacher that a tree flipped upside down would die. So they took an excavator and flipped the tree upside down. And it’s still growing. But the branches are now the roots, and the roots are now these super gnarly looking branches. Be afraid.

But Vi, how can you mention that and NOT post a picture? D:

image

[source]

(via lostinfandoms)

How evidence-based medicine is failing due to biased trials and selective publication

cognitivedefusion:

Open-source.

Abstract

Evidence-based medicine (EBM) was announced in the early 1990s as a ‘new paradigm’ for improving patient care. Yet there is currently little evidence that EBM has achieved its aim. Since its introduction, health care costs have increased while there remains a lack of high-quality evidence suggesting EBM has resulted in substantial population-level health gains. In this paper we suggest that EBM’s potential for improving patients’ health care has been thwarted by bias in the choice of hypotheses tested, manipulation of study design and selective publication. Evidence for these flaws is clearest in industry-funded studies. We argue EBM’s indiscriminate acceptance of industry-generated ‘evidence’ is akin to letting politicians count their own votes. Given that most intervention studies are industry funded, this is a serious problem for the overall evidence base. Clinical decisions based on such evidence are likely to be misinformed, with patients given less effective, harmful or more expensive treatments. More investment in independent research is urgently required. Independent bodies, informed democratically, need to set research priorities. We also propose that evidence rating schemes are formally modified so research with conflict of interest bias is explicitly downgraded in value.

Academic Phrase Bank

arabellesicardi:

sylvides:

For anyone who’s a tad daunted by reading scholarly work (or wants to get up on their speed reading —> understanding game), here is a great resource that breaks down key phrases in academic work.

This is really helpful but it sux academia has to have a phrase bank 4 academic legitimacy

big ideas don’t need to be said with big words

http://arabellesicardi.com/post/86319434856/on-one-hand-i-understand-treading-the-history-of

arabellesicardi:

on one hand i understand treading the history of difference is a valuable idea in art and pretty much everybody who starts making art does some kinda cindy cherman differences thing about difference (her first attempt was terrible and a failure like… let’s be real) but

  1. it’s already been done…

I don’t know… I don’t think it’s really a problem if someone’s making art that’s been “done before” or not bringing about new understandings - because I think we are pretty stunted as a society in terms of being creative period. So just because people are rehashing old ideas doesn’t mean they’re not getting something out of it - and, for that matter, it that might be their version of a “mistake,” even if you’ve already seen something like that. And it doesn’t “push the boundaries” in a way that you find compelling. I’m not sure what you have in mind when you are saying this, but I think it’s better to recognise the need to accept (encourage even?) failure in art without being dismissive of art that’s “been done before”. Each persons perception, understanding, knowledge of art history, etc is unique and I think we need to foster cooperation and support in doing creative acts and taking risks like in making art. Because failing is subjective - don’t you actually think you’re talking about a type of failure? A failure to be original? I think that you can’t be selective in the type of failure you think is acceptable - or else the whole “accepting that failure is part of the process” becomes meaningless.

Why Do People Persist in Believing Things That Just Aren't True?

(Source: sociolab, via cognitivedefusion)